Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
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Horizontal Displacement

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

Ole Brodersen‘s work explores encounters between man and nature, and is produced in Lyngør where Brodersen grew up and lives as the 12th generation of his family. He is strongly connected to this place and the maritime elements here dominate his motifs. His father is a sailmaker, his grandfather was a sailor and he himself used to row to school and has circumnavigated the Atlantic Ocean. 



This series, Horizontal Displacement, is an exploration of the landscape and the natural forces that animate it. Brodersen strives to go beyond simply recording the factual view and tries to convey the tangible experience of being in a landscape. The practice is therefore a balancing act between control and chance; as he is after an image that should feel unrestricted, but that can only be seized in a semi-controlled way. 

Brodersen often operates in an expanded temporal register. Through long exposures, multi-exposures or panorama shots, he works with intervals of time, which gives space to the forces in the landscape. He creates a stage for coincidences and probabilities. The method consists of arranging the shots in such ways that unpredictable spatial developments can be captured.

The concept of Archimedes' principle is that an object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. In Horizontal Displacement, the horizon is photographed from an open drifting boat. The camera used as a tool to register movement becomes a part of the movement it is mapping. Horizontal Displacement employs semi-fast exposures of the horizon, taken throughout the day while being seaborne. 


Where J.M.W. Turner supposedly tied himself to the mast to experience the storm, the camera is tied to its tripod while the conditions are recorded. Semi-fast exposures give unsharp renderings in rough seas and more defined images in calm seas. 

The resulting images are evocative materializations of the physical processes at work. The photographs are, to an extent, directly produced by the landscape. They are not images of the landscape, but rather traces of its movement in which a dynamic portrait of the horizon is made.

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3

 

Untitled
2018

Silver Gelatin Print on fibre paper
100 x 80
1/3