The Icelandic sagas and the Norse myths have their visual heirs in the vivid, camera-based works of these six Nordic artists. Thanks to long exposures, colorful kites flying above a snow-covered Norwegian wilderness dissolve like dye in water in pictures by Ole Brodersen. In Pentti Sammallahti’s intimate black-and-white photographs, the Finnish countryside becomes a fairy-tale backdrop for characters including a frog and a white rabbit. The show’s startling centerpiece is Eija-Liisa Ahtila’s video of a giant spruce tree, projected sideways across six wall-filling panels and gently swaying to a soundtrack of birdsong and wind rushing through branches. From The New Yorker

The Icelandic sagas and the Norse myths have their visual heirs in the vivid, camera-based works of these six Nordic artists. Thanks to long exposures, colorful kites flying above a snow-covered Norwegian wilderness dissolve like dye in water in pictures by Ole Brodersen. In Pentti Sammallahti’s intimate black-and-white photographs, the Finnish countryside becomes a fairy-tale backdrop for characters including a frog and a white rabbit. The show’s startling centerpiece is Eija-Liisa Ahtila’s video of a giant spruce tree, projected sideways across six wall-filling panels and gently swaying to a soundtrack of birdsong and wind rushing through branches.

From The New Yorker

 
Norwegian photographer Ole Brodersen uses materials such as polystyrene, canvas, and rope to capture the landscape in an innovative way. He wants to show the forces of nature that are beyond human control. “Waves, tides, winds, and ocean currents help to determine what the image looks like,” Brodersen says. “The shoot is always planned according to approximate weather conditions, but ultimately it’s nature that controls the outcome.” From Scandinavian Traveler.

Norwegian photographer Ole Brodersen uses materials such as polystyrene, canvas, and rope to capture the landscape in an innovative way. He wants to show the forces of nature that are beyond human control.
“Waves, tides, winds, and ocean currents help to determine what the image looks like,” Brodersen says. “The shoot is always planned according to approximate weather conditions, but ultimately it’s nature that controls the outcome.”

From Scandinavian Traveler.

 
Harper‘s Magazine‘s Browsings is blogging my work. 

Harper‘s Magazine‘s Browsings is blogging my work. 

 
"Ole Brodersen images from his series Trespassing use man-made objects to interfere in photographs of the Norwegian landscape. Using a large format camera to take long exposure pictures, Brodersen relinquishes control over the final image, as this set-up makes it impossible to see the entire frame at the moment of exposure. Found materials, in this case string, cloth, and a kite, serve as symbols of the human presence, and create areas of blurred color and light in otherwise sublime natural settings. InString, Cloth, and Kite 05, one of the exhibition’s title images, a green cloud spreads across the sky over a snowy beach. The cloud suggests a paradoxical dual presence: human in the injection of humble objects into the natural landscape, yet superhuman in its visuality, the cloud appearing like a djin rising from the sea." From artreport.com

"Ole Brodersen images from his series Trespassing use man-made objects to interfere in photographs of the Norwegian landscape. Using a large format camera to take long exposure pictures, Brodersen relinquishes control over the final image, as this set-up makes it impossible to see the entire frame at the moment of exposure. Found materials, in this case string, cloth, and a kite, serve as symbols of the human presence, and create areas of blurred color and light in otherwise sublime natural settings. InString, Cloth, and Kite 05, one of the exhibition’s title images, a green cloud spreads across the sky over a snowy beach. The cloud suggests a paradoxical dual presence: human in the injection of humble objects into the natural landscape, yet superhuman in its visuality, the cloud appearing like a djin rising from the sea."

From artreport.com

 

Aftenposten-TV recorded my Pecha Kucha - talk in Oslo. (Much like a TED-talk). It has subtitles!


Nice article at www.foto.no 
In Norwegian unfortunately, but try the Google-translation.


Another behind the scenes video, where you can adore my yellow boat and check out my kite.

Thanks to:
Bjørn Solli for contributing with music. http://www.bjornsolli.no/
Öystein Thorsen (Kanalstrasse) for shooting and cutting. https://www.youtube.com/user/KanalstrasseMKB
Victoria Hausberg Knutsen for shooting.


Photo: Sigve Aspelund / Dagens Næringsliv

Photo: Sigve Aspelund / Dagens Næringsliv

I‘m mentioned in an article about young art collectors in Dagens Næringsliv‘s "D2-Magazine", the Norwegian equivalent to the Financial Times. 

http://www.dn.no/d2/2015/01/01/2107/Kunst/kunstpausen


This video shows how I‘ve created some upcoming works. It also shows how I use a stapler, how I handle flimsy styrofoam in strong wind and what my family dog looks like.

Thank you ‘Sweden‘ for letting me use your music.
https://www.facebook.com/swedentheband
http://open.spotify.com/artist/0ddbWp2XS89OSbja0uUqeP

And thank you Janna Awa Gillen for helping me film this.


This video shows how I work when I produce photographs for my "Trespassing"-series.

Thank you "Twintoulouse" for letting me use your music.
https://www.facebook.com/Twintoulouse http://open.spotify.com/artist/1Jhz8XVmNoZ7UOwc8T5FSC

And thank you Vidar Sandtrø for helping me film this.